Tag Archives: Buenos Aires

Meat, Cheese and a Photography Lesson

5 Apr

One of our new friends, Jaco, recently took Maggie and me out for lunch at one of his and our favorite restaurants in Buenos Aires, Las Cholas. We loaded up on the “Parrillada Completa” (complete grill) and “Provoleta de Cabra y Rucula” (Argentine provolone goat cheese and arugula).

In the US, we’re not accustomed to eating the non-muscles parts of a cow. Here in Argentina, they eat just about everything, so we ventured out and tasted “morcilla” (blood sausage) for the first time. It got one thumb down from Maggie and two thumbs up from me.

After stuffing our faces, Jaco gave us an amazingly in-depth and helpful photography lesson in crayons. Just in time for Maggie’s mom and sister’s visit!

Buenos Aires: When Race Cars Replaced the Buses

2 Apr

For two days the streets in the heart of downtown Buenos Aires were no longer filled with buses and taxis. Instead, a track had been constructed and race cars circled at record speeds.

The noise was piercing, the speed was thrilling, and the smile on my face wouldn’t go away. I felt like a kid.

The Video

The Photos

Our New Apartment in Buenos Aires

12 Feb

We love our new Buenos Aires apartment. We have experiences here that make us feel as though we’ve stumbled upon a secret.

On a daily basis, we are stretching out on the couch, getting lost (in thought) on our patio, roaming from front to back through the spacious kitchen, looking awkwardly at the bidet, and resting in something called a bedroom.

You see, as much as we appreciated our first apartment in Buenos Aires (especially our landlord), our new apartment has elevated us to a new realm. We now have seating options! We now have outdoor space. We now have a shower with pressure (too much, in fact) and room to move. We now eat dinner anywhere but in bed. And we now enter and leave without having to go through someone else’s home.

These things seem so normal, but I’m coming to appreciate how significant they are. It took us an extra $350 per month to regain these luxuries. Maggie’s hard work in finding teaching jobs has made it all possible. For a bit of comfort and rest, the $350 is money well spent.

Check out our great studio apartment of luxuries.

We found the apartment on Craigslist after 2-3 days of incessant hunting. We rent directly from the landlord, who is awesome, and were able to talk with the previous tenant before signing the contract. We do have to pay in U.S. dollars, which is difficult until Maggie can get her work visa and DNI process started.

 

A Buenos Aires Coffee Guide (with pictures)

5 Feb

La Helvetica in Buenos Aires

There is a procedure to ordering coffee in Buenos Aires – part explicit, part understood.

While living in San Cristobal, our favorite hangout was La Helvetica, a top-of-the-line café and confiteria. There, and with the help of some Porteño friends, we received our B.A. coffee education.

With one week left before a move to Las Cañitas, we decided to compile a list of the variations of coffee that are ubiquitous in all cafes around the city. In our efforts to assist fellow travelers, we put in our due diligence and helped ourselves to a different type of coffee every day this past week.

Most Porteños know what they want as soon as they sit down. As a result, menus aren’t usually offered, you have to request them (“Podrías traerme la carta?”). While extensive, it doesn’t offer much in the way of descriptions or sizes. Here’s some information the menu doesn’t include, which we found helpful:

Coffee Sizes in Most Buenos Aires Cafés

First, the sizes (left to right):

Chico – small, popular for afternoon or evening drinks

Jarrito – probably the most popular size

Doble – double the pleasure (of the chico)

Café con leche – An odd name for a size, but only café con leche (or crema) drinks are served in this cup.

Cappucino – Similar to the café con leche, only cappuccino is served in this cup – although you’ll see many places get creative with the sizing and style of this drink.

The glasses in the back don’t have names that we know of. They are used to serve specialty drinks like the submarino listed below.

Next, the drinks:

Café – Espresso, straight-up. (Comes in chico, jarrito, and doble)

Café Chico in Buenos Aires

Cortado – ¾ espresso ¼ milk. Means, “cut with milk.” (Comes in chico, jarrito, doble)

Café con leche – ½ espresso ½ milk. (Comes in one size)

Café con crema – ½ espresso ½ cream. (Comes in jarrito and café con leche)

Coratdo en Jarrito and Café con Leche in Buenos Aires

Lágrima – 1/10 “a tear” espresso 9/10 milk. (Comes in chico, jarrito, doble)

Café Lágrima (Doble) in Buenos Aires

Cappucino – espresso, cream, milk, and cinnamon (Comes in one size)

Capuccino in Buenos Aires

Submarino – milk, chocolate on the side – a Porteño hot chocolate, genius! (Comes in one size)

Submarino (Hot Chocolate) in Buenos Aires

Submarino (Hot Chocolate) in Buenos Aires

If we’ve left anything out, please let us know about it here.