Before We Age

An Afternoon with Evita in Recoleta

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Church of Nuestra Señora del Pilar

Sadly, we didn’t know too much about Argentina before arriving here. If we had to spout off a few words related to the country we probably would have only come up with “tango,” “beef,” “South America,” and “Evita.” Or we’d just sing the line, “Don’t cry for me Argentina!” We’ve learned a bit more during our first month, but Evita would still top the charts, so we decided we ought to pay her a visit.

In the heart of the Recoleta neighborhood sits one of the top tourist attractions in Buenos Aires: the Recoleta Cemetery. Within it lies María Eva Duarte de Perón, or “Evita.”

The inconspicuous tomb of Eva Perón

A plaque from "her followers" that reads, "Don't cry for me, lost and distant, I'm an essential part of your existence. All my love and pain were my destiny, I assumed my humble responsibility of living like Christ. May whoever followed my path continue in that endeavor."

Evita’s tomb may be the original lure for visiting the cemetery, but the rest of the cemetery steals the show.

We were able to peak into one of the tombs (below). They’re dug about 6-10 feet deep. One of the guys we were hanging out with commented that the tombs were very much like the apartments in the city. All the people are packed in tight, only that the dead didn’t rooms for sleeping or cooking or cleaning up.

After strolling among the dead and tourists in the Recoleta Cemetery, we headed to the market just outside in Plaza Francia. They have everything from artisan jewelry and crafts, leather wallets, belts and bags, and your miscellaneous nick-knacks for tourists.

Then before the sun started to put an end to the day, with our new friends (we regret not taking pictures with them) we joined the locals in the park who were drinking their mate, listening to live music, and watching the entertainers.

Not a bad way to spend a beautiful Sunday afternoon in Buenos Aires! And it didn’t hurt the wallet one bit. Everything was free, except, of course, the street vendor’s coffee.

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